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High Level Setup for Oracle E-Business Tax

Posted by shameemakhtar on June 30, 2009


Platform: R12

Copyright Info: Document from Oracle Help

Oracle E-Business Tax Setup Prerequisites

Complete the setup tasks in the E-Business Suite applications that E-Business Tax uses for tax-related processes. These setup tasks include:

  • Legal Entities and Establishments – Set up legal entities and establishments to represent the first parties and tax authorities involved in your tax transactions.
  • Lookup Codes – Set up lookup codes for E-Business Tax lookup types.
  • Inventory Item Category Sets and Categories – Set up Inventory item categories for the items involved in your tax transactions. You associate Inventory item categories with product fiscal classifications to use in tax determination.
  • TCA Party Class Categories and Codes – Set up TCA classifications to create tax-related categories to classify third parties for tax purposes.
  • Tax Zones – Set up tax zones to group together geographical regions that share the same tax requirement.

Tax Configuration

Complete the E-Business Tax setup tasks to create a basic tax configuration for each of your tax regimes. A basic tax configuration contains the data applicable to the taxes belonging to a tax regime.

The tax configuration setup tasks are:

  • Tax Authority Party Tax Profiles – Set up a party tax profile for each tax authority involved in your transaction taxes.
  • Tax Regimes – Set up tax regimes in each country and geographical region where you do business and where a separate tax applies.
  • First Party Legal Entity Party Tax Profiles – Set up a party tax profile for each first party legal entity involved in your transaction taxes. When you first set up the party tax profile, set up configuration options for the tax regimes associated with the party.
    • Configuration Options – Set up configuration options to associate tax regimes with first parties.
    • Service Subscriptions and Exclusions – Where applicable, set up service subscriptions and service exclusions to use the tax services of external service providers for tax calculation.
  • Taxes – Set up a record for each of the taxes belonging to a tax regime.
  • Tax Reporting Codes – Set up tax reporting types and tax reporting codes to capture additional tax information on transactions for your tax reports, and apply them to the entities that you want to report on for each tax.

Where applicable, add tax reporting codes for the tax.

  • Tax Status – Set up the tax statuses for each tax.
  • Tax Jurisdictions – Set up tax jurisdictions for each tax to identify the geographical locations where the tax authority levies the tax.
  • Tax Recovery Rates – Set up tax recovery rates for each tax for full or partial recovery of taxes on transactions.
    • Tax Accounts – Where applicable, enter or update tax accounts for each tax recovery rate.
  • Tax Rates – Set up tax rates for each tax.
    • Tax Accounts – Where applicable, enter or update tax accounts for each tax rate.
    • Tax Reporting Codes – Where applicable, add tax reporting codes for each tax rate.

Fiscal Classification System

Complete the E-Business Tax setup tasks for fiscal classifications, if you intend to use fiscal classifications in the creation of tax rules for tax determination. Complete each setup task that applies.

  • Oracle Inventory – Set up Inventory-based product fiscal classification types using Oracle Inventory category sets. The product fiscal classification is defaulted on the transaction line for any item that belongs to the inventory category set.
    • Product Classification – Set up product fiscal classifications against an Inventory category set.
    • Product Intended use – Set up product intended use fiscal classifications against an Inventory category set when the intended use of the Inventory item is a factor either in tax determination or the tax recovery rate.
  • Non-Inventory – Set up non-Inventory-based product fiscal classification types using the E-Business Tax product category. You use the E-Business Tax product category if you do not use Oracle Inventory and for other special product classification needs.
    • Product Classification – Set up product fiscal classifications using the E-Business Tax product category. You can enter these product fiscal classification codes on a transaction line irrespective of the item.
    • Product Intended Use – Set up product intended use fiscal classifications using the E-Business Tax product category when the intended use of the product fiscal classification is a factor either in tax determination or the tax recovery rate.
  • Party Classification – Set up party fiscal classifications for your customers and customer sites and suppliers and supplier sites. You can also use the legal classification tax usage of legal activity codes according to your tax determination and tax reporting requirements.
  • Transaction Classification – Set up transaction fiscal classifications to classify transactions for tax determination and tax reporting purposes.
  • Transaction Business Categories – Set up a hierarchy of transaction fiscal classification codes under transaction business categories to identify specific transaction events.
  • Document Classification – Set up document fiscal classifications to classify transactions that require special documentation to accompany the transaction.
  • User Defined Transaction Classification – Set up user defined transaction fiscal classification codes to classify any tax requirement that you cannot define using the existing fiscal classification types.

Country Defaults

Set up country default controls to default tax registration information for the applicable tax regimes and taxes to legal establishment party tax profiles.

Tax Exceptions

Set up tax exceptions to apply special tax rates to products.

Tax Rules

Set up tax rules to manage the setup and execution of the E-Business Tax tax determination process for your tax regimes and taxes.

Complete First Party Legal Entity Party Tax Profile

Complete the party tax profile of the first party legal entity.

  • Party Classifications – If applicable, associate party fiscal classification codes with this party to use as determining factors in tax rules.
  • Tax Reporting Codes – If you associated tax reporting types with party tax profile, enter any applicable tax reporting codes.

First Party Legal Establishment Party Tax Profile

Complete the party tax profile for each legal establishment belonging to the first party legal entity.

  • Tax Registration – Set up tax registrations records for the first party legal establishment.
    • Tax Accounts – Where applicable, enter or update tax accounts for each tax registration.
    • Tax Reporting Codes – If you associated tax reporting types with tax registration, enter any applicable tax reporting codes.
  • Party Fiscal Classifications – If applicable, associate party fiscal classification codes with this party to use as determining factors in tax rules.
  • Tax Reporting Codes – If you associated tax reporting types with party tax profile, enter any applicable tax reporting codes.

Party Tax Profiles for Third Parties

Set up third party tax profiles for your customers and customer sites and suppliers and supplier sites.

Customers

  • Party Tax Profile Details – Set up a party tax profile for each customer.
    • Tax Registration – Set up tax registrations records for the customer.
    • Tax Exemption – Set up tax exemptions for the customer and customer sites.
    • Tax Reporting Codes – If you associated tax reporting types with tax registration, enter any applicable tax reporting codes.
  • Party Fiscal Classifications – If applicable, associate party fiscal classification codes with this party to use as determining factors in tax rules.
  • Tax Reporting Codes – If you associated tax reporting types with party tax profile, enter any applicable tax reporting codes.

Suppliers

  • Party Tax Profile Details – Set up a party tax profile for each supplier.
  • Party Fiscal Classifications – If applicable, associate party fiscal classification codes with this party to use as determining factors in tax rules.
  • Tax Reporting Codes – If you associated tax reporting types with party tax profile, enter any applicable tax reporting codes.

Configuration Owner Tax Options

Where applicable, set up configuration owner tax options for a combination of configuration owner and application event class.

Application Tax Options

Set up application tax options to update migrated tax setup or to create new tax setup based on the Release 11i defaulting hierarchy model. The defaulting hierarchy model defaults tax classification codes to transactions.

Note: You must complete additional setup tasks to use migrated tax data on transactions with E-Business Tax.

Make Tax Available on Transactions

After you complete your tax setup and verify that the tax setup behaves according to your requirements, you can enable each tax in the tax regime. Enabling a tax makes it available for use on transactions.

Simulate Transactions

After you complete your setup tasks, use the Tax Simulator to test the details of your tax configuration.

Using the Tax Configuration Region

After you complete tax setups, you can use the Tax Configuration region to display tax configuration data by country or by tax regime.

Oracle Help

30 June 2009

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Posted in Articles, E-Business Tax, Financials, Oracle Apps, Setup | Tagged: , , , | 7 Comments »

Tutorials – Download tutorials from Metalink

Posted by shameemakhtar on June 19, 2009


Beginners often find loads of difficulty to get proper documentation that can give them a proper insight into Oracle Applications Modules with a good coverage of the business concepts and building blocks.

Oracle tutorials (not Documentation or Implementation Guides) are very good to start with and very easy to access. However you need to have an oracle account with the permission to download patches.

You need to know the patch number to be able to search for the appropriate document to download.

At least that’s one of the solutions. The other solution is to actually use the ‘Advanced Search’ on Oracle and this is what this document is on.

Go to http://metalink.oracle.com

Log onto the site using the ‘Classic Metalink’ Option.

Click on ‘Go’.

The following screen appears:

Click on ‘Advanced Search’

Fill in the following fields:

  1. Product or Product Family: %tut%                            Select ‘Tutor (pro)’
  2. Release: %11i% or %R12%                                              Select as appropriate
  3. Platform or Language:  Microsoft Windows (32-bit)
  4. Description: %inven%                                                     Type the Module

Click on ‘Go’.

Click on ‘Download Now’ to download the tutorial.

In case your query returns no result, change the platform and try again.

Hope this is helpful.

Shameem Bauccha

19 June 2009

Click here to download the article

Posted in Articles, Tutorials | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

Oracle Apps – R12 – High Level Setup for OLM

Posted by shameemakhtar on June 17, 2009


The checklist below should give you a high level overview of setup for the Oracle Learning Management Module (previously OTA):

  1. Define Menus and Responsibilities
  2. Set HR and OTA profile options
  3. Define Training Organizations
  4. Define OLM Lookup Values
  5. Enable Currencies
  6. Define Training Resource Key Flexfield
  7. Define Enrollment Statuses
  8. Define Enrollment Justifications
  9. Define Delivery Modes
  10. Set OTA Waitlisting Options
  11. Schedule Concurrent Programs (requests)
    1. Enrollment and Waitlisting
      1. Enrollment Cancellation and Automatic Waitlisting
    2. Learning Path Reminder
      1. Send Learning Path Completion Target Notifications
      2. Send Learning Path Component Completion Target Notifications
    3. Learning Certification Reminder
      1. Send Certification Notifications
      2. Synchronize Certification Subscriptions with Class Enrollments
      3. Update Certification Subscription Status to Expired
    4. Class Notifications
      1. Send Class Beginning Notifications to Waitlisted Learners
      2. Remind Instructors Prior to Class or Session Start
  12. Assign Roles to Users

Shameem Bauccha

18 June 2009

Posted in Articles, Human Resource Management, Learning Management, Oracle Apps, Setup | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Oracle Apps – R12 – High Level Setup for Core HR

Posted by shameemakhtar on June 17, 2009


Basic Administration Checklist

Define the following Key Flexfields

  1. Job (Human Resources)
  2. Position (Human Resources)
  3. Grade (Human Resources)
  4. Competence (Human Resources)
  5. People Group (Payroll)
  6. Cost Allocation (Payroll)

Define Descriptive Flexfields where required:

  1. Additional Job Details (Human Resources)
  2. Additional Position Details (Human Resources)
  3. Additional Organization Unit Details (Human Resources)

Complete the following Work Structures Checklist:

  1. Define Locations
  2. Define Business Group
  3. Define Other Organizations
  4. Define Organization Hierarchies

Define Roles

  1. Define Jobs
  2. Define Positions
  3. Define Grades
  4. Define Position Hierarchies

Person Types and Assignment Statuses

  1. Define Person types
  2. Define Assignment Statuses for Employees

Profile Options & Lookups

  1. Set Profile Options
  2. Configure Lookups if required

Localization

  1. Run International HRMS setup (if required)

Shameem Bauccha

18 June 2009

Posted in Articles, Core HR, Human Resource Management, Oracle Apps, Setup | Tagged: , , , , | 6 Comments »

Communication – Delivering Training

Posted by shameemakhtar on June 17, 2009


TIPS FOR DELIVERING KEY USER TRAINING

In the course of any ERP implementation, Key User Training (KUT) is a crucial task that will decide to what extent your users are ready to accept the new system and the eventual process changes involved. A good Key User Training will facilitate the subsequent task in the ERP implementation cycle.

As a trainer, know beforehand your audience and their background. As far as possible, group people performing the same tasks or involved in one complete cycle flow together so that you can use a full cycle flow for demonstrattion. Ensure that you have the appropriate audience as well. A Key User is not necessarily a Manager, but rather someone who masters the business flow properly. He should also be someone who can lead and deliver training in turn. Ensure you get dynamic people who are open to learn.

Do not jump directly into the system. Take your time to introduce yourself, know your audience and put them at ease. A joke or two is good but keep the atmosphere professional. Remember that a good first impression is always helpful. As a trainer ensure you speak clearly and loud enough. Your voice should show confidence.

Also introduce your system or ERP. Although the point of a KUT is to explain your users how to use the system, you need first of all to rouse their interest. People are normally resistant to change. One line or two on how the system will facilitate their life will help. Establishing a good relationship with your user and gaining their trust subtly is already half battle won.

Remember that as an implementor, the language you are using in your daily work is not necessarily the same for your users. Ensure that each key term is clear with them. Establishing proper communication is crucial.

Go through the whole process without referring to the system using simple terms and appropriate real case examples. While this is not important, it may help to ensure that both the trainer and the key users are clear with how the process is. If the implementation involves process changes/re-engineering, in this step you can sell the benefits of the changes.

Once you start with the system, ensure that your users understand how to navigate. Go at the pace of your audience. You may decide to entertain questions during the process explanation or at the end. Break down the process and show them step by step on the system.

Use supporting materials like whiteboard, drawings, schemas, slides as much as required. If possible, use simple analogies. These help users understand better.

Do not drag a training too much. Give short breaks if required. Breaks promote informal communication and users normally interact more and share their concerns better. Use this time to mingle with them.

Ensure that your training is interactive. If you encounter errors during the training, do not panic. Remember it is not the final system and you are still testing. If you encounter questions you cannot answer, take note and say you will come back to them. Ensure you do come back to them when promised.

At the end provide relevant supporting material that is properly illustrated and written in very simple terms so that it is accessible to everyone. (You may also provide these prior to the training.) If possible, ensure that your users have ample time for practical sessions.

Do not take a KUT lightly. KUT is a crucial phase where you forge good relationships with the eventual champion users. During KUT you may also identify gaps which were not covered during earlier phases of the project. Keep an open eye for that. Identifying these early will save you a lot of time. Once KUT is done properly, your users are now properly equipped to test your system and identify eventual bugs before go-live. This will ensure than you encounter less bugs in a production environment. Your Key Users will also be able to train the other users better ensuring users make less errors using the system. During support phase, your Key Users will also be the first point to resolve any problem. Support phase will subsequently be easier.

Shameem Bauccha

16 April 2009

Posted in Articles, Communication, Training | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »